blockchain blockchain

Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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Some workers in low-income countries are choosing bitcoin, a virtual currency powered by blockchain technology, to send money to their families. It's cheaper, faster and doesn't require a middleman. Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Eric Frumin (right) stands in front of his solar panels on the roof of his Brooklyn home alongside architect David Cunningham (left) and AeonSolar's Allen Frishman (center). Courtesy of Eric Frumin hide caption

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Courtesy of Eric Frumin