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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte delivers a statement in Manila in Nov. 2017. Duterte will withdraw the Philippines from the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC), according to a statement released to reporters in Manila on Wednesday. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

College students protest to defend press freedom in Manila on Wednesday, after the government cracked down on Rappler, an independent online news site. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Military trucks drive past destroyed buildings and a mosque in what had been the center of fighting in Marawi on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao on Oct. 25, days after the military declared that the battle against ISIS-linked militants was over. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte looks on during the 20th ASEAN China Summit in Manila, Philippines, on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. Ezra Acayan/AP hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/AP

The Deadly Cost Of Duterte's War On Drugs

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gives a speech during Eid al-Fitr celebrations marking the end of Ramadan at the Malacanang Palace in Manila on June 27. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine Sen. Leila de Lima, a former human rights commissioner and one of President Rodrigo Duterte's most vocal opponents, waves to supporters after appearing at a court in suburban Manila on Feb. 24. She was arrested on drug-related charges that she denies. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Jailed Philippine Senator: 'I Won't Be Silenced Or Cowed'

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Residents look at bodies found in a ravine on the outskirts of Marawi on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao on Sunday. Nearly 100 people have died as the government tries to drive out ISIS-allied militants. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine security forces escort Marawi City evacuees at a checkpoint near a neighboring city on the southern island of Mindanao on Wednesday. President Rodrigo Duterte declared martial law on the island, and government forces have been trying to drive militants from Marawi since they began occupying it Tuesday. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte reviews guards just outside Moscow late Monday. He announced Tuesday night he would be cutting his Russia visit short due to violence on Mindanao, where he declared martial law. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte answers questions from the press at Manila International Airport on March 23. Jude Sabio, a lawyer in the Philippines, has filed a complaint at the International Criminal Court accusing Duterte of crimes against humanity. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Activists protest at the headquarters of the Philippine National Police, condemning the government's war on drugs and holding placards showing murdered South Korean businessman Jee Ick-joo. The South Korean businessman was allegedly kidnapped by Philippine policemen under the guise of a raid on illegal drugs and murdered at the national police headquarters in Manila, authorities said. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

A Foreign Businessman's Murder Pauses Philippine Drug War, But For How Long?

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Elizabeth Manosca tends to her baby during a wake for her slain husband and 7-year-old son, who were killed when unidentified gunmen shot through the door of their home in Manila, Philippines, in December. Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images hide caption

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Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, shown at a news conference at Davao's international airport on Dec. 17, says family planning is critical for reducing poverty. Manman Dejeto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manman Dejeto/AFP/Getty Images

A police SWAT team member stands guard while residents watch the body of a person killed in an alleged police anti-drug operation in Manila on Nov. 10. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

In Philippine Drug War, Death Toll Rises And So Do Concerns About Tactics

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Donald Trump Jr. (left) and Eric Trump (right), sons of President-elect Donald Trump, pose with Philippine real estate developer Jose E.B. Antonio at a 2012 news conference in Manila announcing the launch of the Trump Tower Manila, a $150 million project that is now nearing completion. Pat Roque/AP hide caption

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Pat Roque/AP

Who's The New Philippine Envoy? The Man Building Trump Tower Manila

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte attends a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (not pictured) at the prime minister's office in Tokyo on Wednesday. Duterte made a pitch for enhanced economic ties with Japan. Eugene Hoshiko/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping (center) holds a welcome ceremony for visiting Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte before their talks in Beijing on Oct. 20. In remarks during his visit, Duterte said, "I announce my separation from the United States. Both in military, not maybe social, but economics also." Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Demanding Greater Respect From U.S., Philippines Looks To China

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a news conference at the airport in Davao City, prior to his departure for the ASEAN summit on Sept. 5. He called President Obama a "son of a bitch" and warned him not to question extrajudicial killings in the Philippines' war on drugs. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte Distrusts The U.S.

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