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Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor departs federal court in Boston, Jan. 30. On Monday the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, saying it needs to sell its assets to pay back creditors. Kapoor, who was convicted last month of racketeering, owns more than 63% of the company. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates were watched by a nurse and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two-thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

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"People have to be alive to get the help that they need," said Brittney Webster, who got free naloxone at a health center in Carlisle, Pa. Brett Sholtis/WITF hide caption

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Brett Sholtis/WITF

Offering therapy to children in need at school makes sense, says Sarah Nadeau, who adopted two girls from a family that struggled with addiction, because sometimes school is the only stable place they have. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Kristen Philman first tried methamphetamine in her early 20s, as an alternative to heroin and other opioids. When she discovered she was pregnant, she says, it was a wake-up call, and she did what she needed to do to stop using all those drugs. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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Theo Stroomer for NPR

Another Drug Crisis: Methamphetamine Use By Pregnant Women

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Nicole and Ben Veum, with their little boy, Adrian. Nicole was in recovery from opioid addiction when she gave birth to Adrian, and she worried the fentanyl in her epidural would lead to relapse, but it didn't. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

Childbirth In The Age Of Addiction: New Mom Worries About Maintaining Her Sobriety

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Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, testifying before a House subcommittee in May. There are "very tight restrictions" being placed on the distribution and use of Dsuvia, Gottlieb said Friday in addressing the FDA's approval of the new opioid. But critics of the FDA decision say the drug is unnecessary. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Paramedic Larrecsa Cox (center) and her quick-response team, including police Officer Stephanie Coffey (left) and Pastor Virgil Johnson (right), check in at the home in Huntington, W.Va., of someone who was revived a few days before from an overdose. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Knocking On Doors To Get Opioid Overdose Survivors Into Treatment

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The contents of the naloxone kit inside an AED box located in the VA West Roxbury cafeteria. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

VA Adding Opioid Antidote To Defibrillator Cabinets For Quicker Overdose Response

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Barb Williamson runs several sobriety houses in Pennsylvania, commercially run homes where residents support each other in their recovery from opioid addiction. Initially, she says, she saw the use of Suboxone or methadone by residents as "a crutch," and banned them. But evidence the medicines can be helpful changed her mind. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Many 'Recovery Houses' Won't Let Residents Use Medicine To Quit Opioids

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Baby boomers who use marijuana seem to be using it more often than in previous years, a recent survey finds — 5.7 percent of respondents ages 50 to 64 said they'd tried it in the past month. The drug is also gaining popularity among people in their 70s and 80s. Manonallard/Getty Images hide caption

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Manonallard/Getty Images

Dispatches From A 'Dopesick' America

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Victoria gave birth to her daughter Lili while in treatment for opioid dependency. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Babies Born Dependent On Opioids Need Touch, Not Tech

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Melania Trump talks with a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday. The first lady was promoting her Be Best campaign to help children. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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Kentucky filed a lawsuit against Walgreens on Thursday for allegedly failing to adequately monitor its operations as it shipped and dispensed large quantities of opioids. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A pharmacist speaks with a customer at Walmart Neighborhood Market in Bentonville, Ark., in 2014. On Monday Walmart introduced a new set of guidelines for dispensing opioid medications. Sarah Bentham/AP hide caption

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Sarah Bentham/AP

Amanda Williammee and her daughter Taycee. Now a happy preschooler, the little girl was born with neonatal abstinence syndrome — a condition that includes opioid withdrawal symptoms like tremors, irritability, sleep problems and high-pitched crying. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom's Recovery

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First lady Melania Trump looks at President Donald Trump as she arrives for an event where she announced her initiatives in the Rose Garden of the White House Monday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

In Traditional First-Lady Style, Melania Trump Unveils 'Be Best' Initiative

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