opioid opioid

Amanda Williammee and her daughter Taycee. Now a happy preschooler, the little girl was born with neonatal abstinence syndrome — a condition that includes opioid withdrawal symptoms like tremors, irritability, sleep problems and high-pitched crying. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom's Recovery

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First lady Melania Trump looks at President Donald Trump as she arrives for an event where she announced her initiatives in the Rose Garden of the White House Monday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

In Traditional First-Lady Style, Melania Trump Unveils 'Be Best' Initiative

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Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams testifies before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill November 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. Adams testified about community-level health promotion programs and businesses that offer incentives to employees that practice healthy lifestyles. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Surgeon General Urges More Americans To Carry Opioid Antidote

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Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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Velva Poole works to reunite children with parents who have been grappling with substance use disorder. Mentoring the parents, she says, is a big part of the state-sponsored program's success. Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media hide caption

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Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media

Opioid Treatment Program Helps Keep Families Together

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Mady Ohlman, who lives near Boston and has been sober for more than four years, says many drug users hit a point when the disease and the pursuit of illegal drugs crushes the will to live. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

How Many Opioid Overdoses Are Suicides?

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Huntington, W.V. Fire Chief Jan Rader is a central figure in the Netflix documentary short Heroin(e). Rebecca Kiger/Netflix hide caption

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Rebecca Kiger/Netflix

'Heroin(e)': The Women Fighting Addiction In Appalachia

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Francisco Hidalgo prepares to receive a trigger point injection from Dr. Alexis LaPietra (right) at St. Joseph's University Medical Center in Paterson, N.J., while Dr. Tyler Manis observes. An alternative to opioids, the trigger point injection involves dry needling to stop pain from a muscle spasm and a shot of local anesthetic for the soreness from the needle. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

ER Reduces Opioid Use By More Than Half With Dry Needles, Laughing Gas

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On Wednesday Walmart began distributing a new solution to help customers dispose of leftover opioid prescriptions. But CDC says, just flush them down the toilet. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Will Gersch teaches a class as part of a Colorado Kaiser Permanente pain management clinic. John Daley / Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley / Colorado Public Radio

Pain Management Program Offers An Alternative To Opioids

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George Patterson is one of the volunteers who run Phoenix's only syringe exchange program, a mobile program called Shot in the Dark. Will Stone / KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone / KJZZ

Fight The Opioid Epidemic, All Agree. But Strategies Vary Widely

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After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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Andy Baker/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Telemedicine For Addiction Treatment? Picture Remains Fuzzy

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Doctors often prescribe more opioid painkillers than necessary following surgery, for a variety of reasons. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

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Utah Jazz player Rodney Hood injured his ankle during a game against the Minnesota Timberwolves earlier this year. Pain management in sports sometimes involves medications and their attendant risks. Hannah Foslien/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Investigating Pain Management In Sports

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An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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The contents of a drug overdose rescue kit at a May 13, 2015, training session in Buffalo, N.Y., on how to administer naloxone, which reverses the effects of heroin and prescription painkillers. Carolyn Thompson/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Thompson/AP

To Save Opioid Addicts, This Experimental Court Is Ditching The Delays

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