opioid opioid

After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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Telemedicine For Addiction Treatment? Picture Remains Fuzzy

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Doctors often prescribe more opioid painkillers than necessary following surgery, for a variety of reasons. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

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Utah Jazz player Rodney Hood injured his ankle during a game against the Minnesota Timberwolves earlier this year. Pain management in sports sometimes involves medications and their attendant risks. Hannah Foslien/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Investigating Pain Management In Sports

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An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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The contents of a drug overdose rescue kit at a May 13, 2015, training session in Buffalo, N.Y., on how to administer naloxone, which reverses the effects of heroin and prescription painkillers. Carolyn Thompson/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Thompson/AP

To Save Opioid Addicts, This Experimental Court Is Ditching The Delays

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WBUR reporter Martha Bebinger (right) walks with Kristin, a drug user who says she has been repeatedly sexually assaulted while high on drugs. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Women With Opioid Addiction Live With Daily Fear Of Assault, Rape

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Physical therapy as well as cognitive therapy are part of a promising approach to managing chronic pain without drugs. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Across the state of Maine, the number of prescriptions for painkillers is dropping. But some patients who have chronic pain say they need high doses of the medication to be able to function. Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Getty Images

Intent On Reversing Its Opioid Epidemic, A State Limits Prescriptions

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Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

After a briefing Tuesday on the opioid crisis, President Trump remarked on its severity but did not offer many specifics on tackling the problem. Two days later, he said his administration would declare a national emergency. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Some States Say Declaring An Emergency Has Helped In The Opioid Fight

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First responders in Washington, D.C., bring naloxone on every emergency call. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

First Responders Spending More On Overdose Reversal Drug

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Judge Lewis Gregory, head of the city court in Greenwood, Ind., began allowing drug court participants to begin taking Vivitrol after meeting with an Alkermes sales representative. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

To Grow Market Share, A Drugmaker Pitches Its Product To Judges

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The morphine-like pain killer Oxycontin is just one of a number of opioids fueling a substance use crisis in the U.S. federal health officials say. And successful treatment for the substance use disorder can be costly. Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source

Opioid Treatment Funds In Senate Bill Would Fall Far Short Of Needs

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Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

GOP's Proposed Cuts To Medicaid Threaten Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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Opana ER, a potent extended-release opioid, was approved by the FDA for pain management in 2006. But the agency says Endo's attempts to reformulate the pills to make them harder to crush, dissolve and inject have not been successful. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Charmayne Healy (left) and Miranda Kirk (right), co-founders of the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, have helped Melinda Healy (center) with their peer-support programs. Nora Saks/MTPR hide caption

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Nora Saks/MTPR

2 Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation

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A test strip designed to help doctors check a patient's urine for fentanyl is being distributed in the Bronx to encourage users of heroin or other opioids to check what's in their syringe before they inject. Mary Harris/WNYC hide caption

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Mary Harris/WNYC

An Experiment Helps Heroin Users Test Their Street Drugs For Fentanyl

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A public restroom on the platform of the Central Square MBTA station in Cambridge, Mass., which people have used as a place for getting high. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Public Restrooms Become Ground Zero In The Opioid Epidemic

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