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As Brexit Pulls Britain Apart, It Could Bring Ireland Back Together

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Luxembourg's Prime Minister Xavier Bettel (from left), U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the European Commission's chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, at the start of an EU summit on Thursday in Brussels. EU and British negotiators came to an agreement on the United Kingdom's departure from the EU known as Brexit. Thierry Monasse/Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Monasse/Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday that he'd forged a new Brexit agreement with the European Union. Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Wiktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Parliament reconvened at the Palace of Westminster on Wednesday after the U.K. Supreme Court ruled its suspension by Prime Minister Boris Johnson "unlawful." Hollie Adams/Getty Images hide caption

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Hollie Adams/Getty Images

Anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller won her case against Prime Minister Boris Johnson, one of two actions that targeted his advice to the queen to prorogue Parliament. Miller is seen here outside the Supreme Court in London after the ruling was announced. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

U.K. Parliament To Resume After Supreme Court Rules Suspension Was 'Unlawful'

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Member of Parliament Joanna Cherry and dozens of allies won a decision from Scotland's Court of Session, which ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's suspension of Parliament is illegal. Cherry is seen here outside the court last month. Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, seen at a joint news conference Monday with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar in Dublin. Johnson has suffered a rough couple of weeks, as lawmakers scuttled first his attempt to maintain a hard Brexit deadline — then, his attempt to call a snap general election. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

James Toner feeds cows at his family's dairy farm in Northern Ireland's County Armagh. Thirty-five percent of Northern Irish milk is sold to Ireland. Northern Irish farmers who have built lucrative cross-border trade with the Irish Republic are especially worried about the possibility of a no-deal Brexit. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

How A No-Deal Brexit Could Destroy The Irish Dairy Industry — And Threaten Peace

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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, seen hosting health service workers Tuesday at No. 10 Downing St. in London. The same day in the House of Commons, Johnson was dealt a political blow when the defection of a fellow Conservative left him without a working majority in Parliament. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Monday that he doesn't want an election amid the Brexit crisis and issued a rallying cry to lawmakers to back him in securing a Brexit deal. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson maneuvered Wednesday to give his political opponents less time to block a no-deal Brexit split from Europe before the Oct. 31 withdrawal deadline, winning Queen Elizabeth II's approval to suspend Parliament. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

The pound was long the symbol of Britain's economic might. The chaos surrounding the country's 2016 decision to leave the European Union has sent the currency falling sharply. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Like The Empire Itself, The British Pound Is Not What It Used To Be

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Thousands of demonstrators gather outside Houses of Parliament on Wednesday in London to protest against plans to suspend Parliament. WIktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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WIktor Szymanowicz/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, seen during a visit to a hospital in southwest England on Monday, calls the backstop deal "inconsistent with the sovereignty of the U.K." Peter Nicholls/AP hide caption

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Peter Nicholls/AP

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is determined to bring the U.K. out of the European Union at the end of October, deal or no deal. Dominic Lipinski/AP hide caption

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Dominic Lipinski/AP

Can U.K.'s New Prime Minister Pull Off Brexit? Here's What To Know

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Liberal Democrat candidate Jane Dodds (center) celebrates her election victory with former Energy Secretary Ed Davey and Kirsty Williams, member of the Welsh Assembly, at Royal Welsh showground in Builth Wells, U.K., on Friday. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boris Johnson waves outside 10 Downing Street in London on Wednesday. The polarizing and showboating new prime minister has vowed to deliver on the U.K. leaving the European Union in October, whether or not a deal is reached. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

President Trump shakes hands with Boris Johnson during the U.N. General Assembly in 2017. The United Kingdom and the United States are about to be led by two remarkably similar figures. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The Similarities Between Boris Johnson And Donald Trump

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