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Barb Williamson runs several sobriety houses in Pennsylvania, commercially run homes where residents support each other in their recovery from opioid addiction. Initially, she says, she saw the use of Suboxone or methadone by residents as "a crutch," and banned them. But evidence the medicines can be helpful changed her mind. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Many 'Recovery Houses' Won't Let Residents Use Medicine To Quit Opioids

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A doctor at a Boston Medical Center clinic counsels a patient who has become addicted to opioid painkillers, and wants help kicking the habit. Addiction specialists say drugs like suboxone, which mitigates withdrawal symptoms, can greatly improve his odds of success. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

When used in conjunction with counseling, Suboxone strips placed under the tongue can help ease opioid cravings and other withdrawal symptoms in people trying to quit a heroin or painkiller habit, doctors say. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Insurance Rules Can Hamper Recovery From Opioid Addiction

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A demonstration dose of Suboxone film, which is placed under the tongue. It is used to treat opioid addiction. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Maryland Switches Opioid Treatments, And Some Patients Cry Foul

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As many as 70,000 more people could get access to office-based treatment for opioid use now that the administration has raised the cap on the number of patients each doctor is allowed to treat. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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A man in Mount Airy, Md., shakes Suboxone pills from a bottle in late March. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Treating Opioid Addiction With A Drug Raises Hope And Controversy

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