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Lillie Pete sifts the juniper ash before adding it to her blue corn mush. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

To Get Calcium, Navajos Burn Juniper Branches To Eat The Ash

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Vintage Seminole patchwork on display at the home of Patsy West, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Will O'Leary hide caption

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Courtesy of Will O'Leary

Seminole Patchwork: Admiration And Appropriation

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A road through the Gila River Indian Community in 2014. The tribe is one of 17 tribal governments the U.S. government announced Monday it had settled lawsuits with, over alleged mismanagement of land and resources. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

U.S. officials and members of Native American Nations attend an "emergency meeting" at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. They were gathered to object to a Paris auction house's upcoming sale of objects sacred to Native Americans. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP