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A picture taken in April shows sargassum seaweed on the French Caribbean Island of Guadeloupe. Helene Valenzuela /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Helene Valenzuela /AFP/Getty Images

Masses Of Seaweed Threaten Fisheries And Foul Beaches

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Researchers at the University of California, Davis are testing whether adding seaweed to cows' feed reduces methane emissions. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Surf And Turf: To Reduce Gas Emissions From Cows, Scientists Look To The Ocean

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Scientists are hoping that seagrasses could act as a buffer against acidifying oceans. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?

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Matt Kern harvests wild bull kelp for salsa that he and his partner, Lisa Heifetz, are selling as part of his new business. Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz

Sea algae at low tide along the Irish coast. Seaweed was long a part of Irish cuisine. Nutrient-rich, it helped some survive the Great Famine. Irish cooks reviving the practice say it's not just good for you – it's a zap of flavor from the sea. AdventurePicture/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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AdventurePicture/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Seth Barker of Maine Fresh Sea Farms checks a seaweed line. People have foraged wild seaweed off the Eastern Seaboard for centuries. But now a much more active effort to grow seaweed in the U.S. is afoot. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Seaweed On Your Dinner Plate: The Next Kale Could Be Kelp

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