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plant-based diet

Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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To help protect the planet and promote good health, people should eat less than 1 ounce of red meat a day and limit poultry and milk, too. That's according to a new report from some of the top names in nutrition science. People should instead consume more nuts, fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, the report says. The strict recommended limits on meat are getting pushback. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Sales of McDonald's new soy-based patty have far surpassed estimates in Sweden, where half the population says it's interested in more vegetarian options. Are diners just curious or truly lovin' it? McDonald's Sweden hide caption

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McDonald's Sweden

Brahman cattle graze in a field in Innisfail, Queensland, Australia. Researchers can estimate the greenhouse gas emissions and land used to produce various foods in different parts of the world. They've used that data to calculate the environmental impact of a shift in what people eat. David Messent/Getty Images hide caption

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David Messent/Getty Images

At Saxon + Parole, a New York City restaurant, chef Brad Farmerie serves up the Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger that sizzles, smells and even bleeds like the real thing. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Saving The Planet, One Burger At A Time: This Juicy Patty Is Meat-Free

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Frances Moore Lappe speaks at a Rainforest Action Network event. When she wrote the best-selling Diet For A Small Planet back in 1971, she helped start a conversation about the social and environmental impacts of the foods we choose. Rainforest Action Network/Flickr hide caption

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Rainforest Action Network/Flickr

If You Think Eating Is A Political Act, Say Thanks To Frances Moore Lappe

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Silicon Valley-based Impossible Foods has taken a high-tech approach to creating a plant-based burger that smells and tastes like real meat. At the company's headquarters in Redwood City, Calif., chef Traci Des Jardins served the Impossible Burger (pictured uncooked) with vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, mashed avocado, caramelized onions, chopped cornichon, tomato and lettuce on a pretzel bun. Maggie Carson Jurow hide caption

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Maggie Carson Jurow