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economic growth

The circles on the map pinpoint the location of thousands of Chinese-funded development projects. The bigger the circle, the bigger the investment. The largest circles represent projects in the multibillion-dollar range. Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR

Speaking at the White House, President Trump called Friday's report of 4.1 percent economic growth in the second quarter "amazing." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

U.S. Economy Surges To A 4.1 Percent Growth Pace In 2nd Quarter

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Workers weld drawers on the assembly line at the Metal Box International toolbox factory in Franklin Park, Ill. Many analysts estimate that U.S. economic growth picked up in the second quarter. Tim Aeppel/Reuters hide caption

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Tim Aeppel/Reuters

How Fast Did The Economy Grow? Forecasts Are All Over The Place

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A handful of experts are pointing to business uncertainty and a few financial and economic indicators as signs of a possible recession on the horizon. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Is The U.S. Headed For Recession?

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A shopper makes a purchase at the J.C. Penney store in North Riverside, Ill., Nov. 17. U.S. consumer spending grew in the fourth quarter at its fastest pace in three years. Kamil Krzaczynski/Reuters hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski/Reuters

A construction worker at an apartment and retail complex in Nashville. The U.S. economy grew at a less-than-expected 2.6 percent pace in the fourth quarter. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway speaks at a press conference with (from left) Republican Sens. Thom Tillis and David Perdue, and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on Nov. 7. Only 2 percent of economists polled thought the GOP tax plan would lead to higher growth. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Donald Trump and investor Wilbur Ross, his nominee for commerce secretary, pose for a photo following their meeting at Trump International Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., on Nov. 20. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump's Immigration Plan Could Undermine Promise To Boost Economy

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People stand in line to register for a job fair in Miami Lakes, Fla. A new study shows a growing number of young people in developed countries are giving up on work, school and training. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Coleson McCoy watches Heather Milliron work on a project in advanced physical science at the Global Impact STEM Academy in Springfield, Ohio. The city, which lost jobs as factories closed, is trying to boost local incomes with education. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Candidates Want To Raise The Economic Tide To Lift Opportunity, But How?

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