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Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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Some 80 plastic bags extracted from within a whale are being laid out in Songkhla, Thailand, in this still image captured from video footage. Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources/Social Media/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS hide caption

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Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources/Social Media/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS

A water bottle is filled with sparkling water at a public fountain in a park in Paris. The city's mayor hopes the free bubbly water will help persuade residents to give up plastic bottles in favor of tap water. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

To Burst The Bottle Bubble, Fountains In Paris Now Flow With Sparkling Water

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Henderson Island, in the South Pacific, is thousands of miles from any major industrial centers or human communities. But it's filled with trash — more than 37 million pieces of it, researchers say. Jennifer Lavers/University of Tasmania hide caption

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Jennifer Lavers/University of Tasmania

The larvae of Galleria mellonella, commonly known as a wax worm, is able to biodegrade plastic bags. Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab hide caption

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Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

The Lowly Wax Worm May Hold The Key To Biodegrading Plastic

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A great shearwater flies off the coast of Tasmania. John Harrison/Wikipedia hide caption

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John Harrison/Wikipedia

Why Seabirds Love To Gobble Plastic Floating In The Ocean

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