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On his deathbed, Alexander Litvinenko, a former Russian intelligence agent who defected, accused Vladimir Putin of ordering his assassination. Alistair Fuller/AP hide caption

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Alistair Fuller/AP

Sergey Naryshkin speaks during the European Social Charter Conference in March 2016 in Turin, Italy, prior to his appointment to head Russia's SVR foreign intelligence service. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

"Putin and his entourage are absolutely not interested in bad relations with America. They're scared of that. But the circumstances are such that they can't help but use anti-Americanism to strengthen their grip on power," says Gennady Gudkov, an opposition politician formerly with the KGB, shown here in February. Kommersant Photo/Kommersant via Getty Images hide caption

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Kommersant Photo/Kommersant via Getty Images

What Was Russia's Role In 2016 U.S. Election? 2 Former KGB Officials Weigh In

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A police officer stands guard in Moscow's Red Square. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Journalist: Russia's Interference Is An 'Assault On The Western Liberal Order'

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Alexander Litvinenko, a former Russian security agent, died in 2006 after drinking tea laced with the radioactive element polonium-210 at a London hotel. A British inquiry found that his death was the work of the Russian security service. Natasja Weitsz/Getty Images hide caption

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Natasja Weitsz/Getty Images

The Curious Deaths Of Kremlin Critics

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Courtesy of Aragvi

Dine Like A Soviet Spy: Old KGB Haunt Opens Its Doors Again

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Vyacheslav Trubnikov (right) was head of the Foreign Intelligence Service, Russia's equivalent of the CIA, from 1996 to 2000. He's shown here speaking with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage in 2001 in Moscow. Trubnikov was Russia's deputy foreign minister at the time. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Russia's Ex-Spy Chief Shares Opinions Of His American Counterparts

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