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Amyloid plaques are characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. The new drug Aduhelm is able to remove this sticky substance that builds up in the brains of patients with the disease, but many doctors are still skeptical of how well it really works. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra via Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra via Getty Images

Cost and controversy are limiting use of new Alzheimer's drug

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A doctor reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. The announcement was a surprise because the company stopped two studies of aducanumab in 2019 after partial results suggested it was not working. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Approves Aducanumab — A Controversial Drug For Alzheimer's

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Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan in 2018 at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen has received federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

The FDA Has Approved A New Alzheimer's Drug — Here's Why That's Controversial

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Plaques located in the gray matter of the brain are key indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Cecil Fox/Science Source hide caption

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Cecil Fox/Science Source

Scientists Push Plan To Change How Researchers Define Alzheimer's

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Finding some change in the blood of an Alzheimer's patient that accurately reflects the damaging changes in the brain has been tough. utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Leland Bobbe/Getty Images

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

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Tennessee Head Coach Pat Summitt of Tennessee celebrates with her son Tyler after the Lady Volunteers defeated Georgia in the championship game of the NCAA Women's Final Four in 1996. Matthew Stockman/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Stockman/Getty Images