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seafood industry

Swordfish like this one, sunning itself off the coast of Ventura, Calif. have traditionally been caught in drift gillnets. But ocean activists say the method is unsustainable because it captures too many other sea creatures. Douglas Klug/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Klug/Getty Images

Barrels of fish sit on a dock after being unloaded from a boat in Songkhla, Thailand, in February 2016. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Was Your Seafood Caught With Slave Labor? New Database Helps Retailers Combat Abuse

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Raw fresh fish for sale at a supermarket. Using seafood guides to decide which fish is the most environmentally choice can be difficult when different guides make slightly different recommendations. intraprese/Getty Images hide caption

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intraprese/Getty Images

A vaquita caught as by-catch in Baja California, Mexico. Accidental entanglement in fishing gear is one of the biggest threat to this species, which is down to only 60 animals. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

A squid salad in Los Angeles. In California, squid is an economic driver of the seafood industry. But most of this squid is frozen and exported overseas to China to be processed and distributed across the globe. Rick Loomis/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Loomis/LA Times via Getty Images