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DeAndre Harris, on the ground, is assaulted in a parking garage beside the Charlottesville, Va., police station on Aug. 12, 2017, after a white nationalist rally was dispersed by police. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images

The Weight of Our Words

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"It brings back a lot of shame," Christian Picciolini says of his time fronting a white power punk band. He has since disavowed the white supremacist movement and works to help others disengage from it too. Dennis Sevilla/Hachette Book Group hide caption

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Dennis Sevilla/Hachette Book Group

A Former Neo-Nazi Explains Why Hate Drew Him In — And How He Got Out

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Antifa members and counterprotesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Park in Berkeley, Calif. Amy Osborne/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Osborne/AFP/Getty Images

I Saw His Humanity: 'Reveal' Host On Protecting Right-Wing Protester

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A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/Getty Images

Neo-Nazis and white supremacists who participated in the protests in Charlottesville, Va., are being identified online — and the family of one man says they no longer have anything to do with him. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Richard Spencer, a white nationalist who claims to have coined the term "alt-right," speaks at the Texas A&M University campus in Dec. 2016. The number of campus visits made by white nationalist leaders like Spencer looking to connect with students personally has increased. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

As White Supremacists Push Onto Campuses, Schools Wrestle With Response

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James Harris Jackson is escorted out of a police precinct in New York on March 22. Police said Jackson, accused of fatally stabbing a black man in New York City, told investigators he traveled from Baltimore specifically to attack black people. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Critics are taking aim at the coalition of Americans pushing "to rethink essentially everything about the way we treat each other." Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images

Radio talk show host Alex Jones speaks during a rally in support of Donald Trump near the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 18. Brooks Kraft/Getty Images hide caption

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Brooks Kraft/Getty Images

Radio Conspiracy Theorist Claims Ear Of Trump, Pushes 'Pizzagate' Fictions

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