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In this Aug. 12, 2017, file photo, a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. A trial is beginning in Charlottesville, Va., to determine whether white nationalists who planned the so-called Unite the Right rally will be held civilly responsible for the violence that erupted. Ryan M. Kelly/AP hide caption

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Ryan M. Kelly/AP

Talia Lavin infiltrated white supremacist online groups for more than a year to research her book Culture Warlords: My Journey into the Dark Web of White Supremacy. Yonit Lavin hide caption

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Yonit Lavin

White Supremacy And Its Online Reach

Talia Lavin went undercover in white supremacist online communities, creating fake personas that would gain her access to the dark reaches of the internet normally off-limits to her, a Jewish woman. That research laid the groundwork for her book, Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy. Lavin talks to Sam about what it was like to infiltrate those online spaces, what she learned, and how white supremacy cannot exist without anti-Semitism.

White Supremacy And Its Online Reach

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President Donald Trump during the first presidential debate Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

President Trump gestures while speaking during the first presidential debate on Tuesday, at Case Western University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Bombing victim Sarah Collins Rudolph, pictured in 2013, argues that Ku Klux Klan members who attacked the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963 were "inspired and motivated by then-Gov. [George] Wallace's racist rhetoric." Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

Armed volunteers take up rooftop positions in a Minneapolis neighborhood; those who are not allowed to carry guns are kept off the roof. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

Armed Neighborhood Groups Form In The Absence Of Police Protection

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From left: Luke Austin Lane, Jacob Kaderli and Michael Helterbrand are accused of plotting "to overthrow the government and murder a Bartow County couple," according to police in Floyd County, Ga. AP hide caption

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AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at the company's annual developers conference in San Jose, Calif., May 1, 2018. Facebook is beginning to enforce a ban on white nationalist content. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

With Facebook Ban On White Extremism, International Norms Apply To U.S.

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White supremacists march through Charlottesville, Va., the night before the "Unite the Right" rally in August 2017. Federal agents have arrested four men on riot charges connected to the rally. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

DeAndre Harris, on the ground, is assaulted in a parking garage beside the Charlottesville, Va., police station on Aug. 12, 2017, after a white nationalist rally was dispersed by police. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP/Getty Images

The Weight of Our Words

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"It brings back a lot of shame," Christian Picciolini says of his time fronting a white power punk band. He has since disavowed the white supremacist movement and works to help others disengage from it too. Dennis Sevilla/Hachette Book Group hide caption

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Dennis Sevilla/Hachette Book Group

A Former Neo-Nazi Explains Why Hate Drew Him In — And How He Got Out

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Antifa members and counterprotesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally Sunday at Martin Luther King Jr. Park in Berkeley, Calif. Amy Osborne/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Osborne/AFP/Getty Images

I Saw His Humanity: 'Reveal' Host On Protecting Right-Wing Protester

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A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images