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buprenorphine

The drug buprenorphine blocks the cravings associated with addiction. It comes in tablets and dissolvable film. The only injectable form available is a drug called Sublocade; a rival drug is ready for market but may be blocked for several years by the FDA. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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In Midst Of Opioid Crisis, FDA May Block New Addiction Drug From Market

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The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

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A view inside Rhode Island's John J. Moran Medium Security Prison, in Cranston. Rhode Island is the only state to screen every individual who comes into the correctional system for opioid use disorder, and to offer, in conjunction with with counseling, all three medically effective treatments. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Rhode Island Prisons Push To Get Inmates The Best Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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Suboxone, a medicine to treat opioid addiction, helps people struggling with substance abuse by blocking their cravings and physical withdrawal symptoms. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

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Dispatches From A 'Dopesick' America

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Greg Miller shows the Suboxone medication in 2016 that he has taken daily for his addiction to painkillers. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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Medicaid spending on medications used to treat opioid addiction has risen sharply in recent years. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

As many as 70,000 more people could get access to office-based treatment for opioid use now that the administration has raised the cap on the number of patients each doctor is allowed to treat. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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