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Brandt Jean, Botham Jean's younger brother, hugs former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger in court after saying he forgives her for killing his brother. Guyger received a 10-year prison sentence for murder. via REUTERS hide caption

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via REUTERS

Fired Dallas police officer Amber Guyger becomes emotional as she testifies in her murder trial on Friday. She told police she thought that her neighbor's apartment was her own and that he was an intruder. Tom Fox/AP hide caption

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Tom Fox/AP

Amber Guyger, the former Dallas police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man in his own home told a 911 dispatcher, "I thought it was my apartment" several times as she waited for emergency responders to arrive. Guyger is charged in the September, 2018 killing of Botham Jean. Mesquite Police Department via AP hide caption

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Mesquite Police Department via AP

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger fatally shot an unarmed black neighbor whose apartment she said she entered by mistake, believing it to be her own. AP hide caption

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AP

Jury Selection Begins For Ex-Dallas Police Officer Who Shot Man In His Own Home

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Dallas Police Chief David Brown briefs the media about a shooting at Dallas Police headquarters on June 15, 2015. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

'Called To Rise': Dallas Police Chief On Overcoming Racial Division

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Trainees participate in a tactical defense class at the Dallas Police Basic Training Academy. The officer deaths in July strengthened the camaraderie among recruits training at the academy. Yvonne Muther/NPR hide caption

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Yvonne Muther/NPR

Dallas Police Chief David Brown, who had drawn some criticism during his tenure and also widespread praise for his response to the July sniper attack that killed five officers, has announced his retirement. He says he will step down on Oct. 22 after 33 years with Dallas police. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Police keep watch during a protest Friday in Dallas. Ron Jenkins/AP hide caption

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Ron Jenkins/AP

Dallas Police Recruitment Call Answered, But Pay Issues Are A Concern

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Dallas police officer Kimberly Howard wears a cross given to her earlier in the day by a random well-wisher outside department headquarters in Dallas on Saturday. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

In Dallas, An Already-Embattled Police Department Mourns

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Dallas police detain a driver after several police officers were shot Thursday evening in downtown Dallas. Snipers shot police officers — killing several — during a peaceful protest, the city's police chief said at a news conference. L.M. Otero/AP hide caption

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L.M. Otero/AP