melania trump melania trump

Melania Trump talks with a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday. The first lady was promoting her Be Best campaign to help children. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

First lady Melania Trump talks with Border Patrol agents as she visits a processing center of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility in Tucson, Ariz. Thursday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

First lady Melania Trump leaves Joint Base Andrews in Maryland wearing a jacket with the words "I REALLY DON'T CARE. DO U?" after her visit Thursday with migrant children who are being detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton (from left), Michelle Obama, Melania Trump, Rosalynn Carter and Laura Bush all have expressed their concern about migrant children being torn from parents at the Mexico border. AP hide caption

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AP

First lady Melania Trump speaks about her "Be Best" initiative in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 7. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

One Month Later, What's Become Of Melania Trump's 'Be Best' Campaign?

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President Trump with first lady Melania Trump returns to the White House May 10, 2018, after greeting three freed Americans who had been detained in North Korea. Until Monday night, May 10 was the last time the first lady had been seen publicly. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

First lady Melania Trump looks at President Donald Trump as she arrives for an event where she announced her initiatives in the Rose Garden of the White House Monday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

In Traditional First-Lady Style, Melania Trump Unveils 'Be Best' Initiative

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Japan's first lady Akie Abe, left, and first lady Melania Trump, right, arrive for a news conference at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club on April 18 in Palm Beach, Fla. Mrs. Trump is set to announce some new initiatives next week. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Brigitte Macron, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and President Trump attend a state arrival ceremony at the White House on Tuesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

First State Dinner: A Chance For Melania Trump To Put Her Stamp On The White House

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The Gridiron dinner, like Fight Club, has rules. Rule No. 1: "Singe, don't burn" with your roast-style jokes. Rule No. 2: No photographs, video or tweeting during the ceremony. There are a few more rules, but really, we're just trying to explain why the photograph above is a shot of Trump from last month. Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

More than a year after President Trump was sworn in, his inaugural committee said in tax filings that it raised nearly $107 million and spent almost all of the money. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The historic Jackson Magnolia, planted on the south grounds of the White House, was trimmed back on Wednesday. The tree is in poor health, needs artificial support and is in danger of falling. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Portions Of Ailing White House Magnolia Removed Over Safety Concerns

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The first lady, born Melanija Knavs, is from the town of Sevnica in central Slovenia. Before 2016, it was known for its underwear factory, salami festival and sport fishing. "Melania put us on the world map," says Mayor Srecko Ocvirk, who has helped lead a Melania-themed campaign to attract more tourists here. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

For Melania Trump's Slovenian Hometown, First Lady's Fame Is Good For Business

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First lady Melania Trump arrives in West Palm Beach, Fla., last week. On Wednesday, she reached a deal to settle defamation claims over an article published in the Daily Mail tabloid about her time as a model. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Melania Trump stands beside her husband, GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in July. Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images hide caption

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Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images

Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, speaks to the delegates on start of the first day of the Republican National Convention. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Melania Trump, wife of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, waves to the crowd after delivering a speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images