worms worms

The larvae of Galleria mellonella, commonly known as a wax worm, is able to biodegrade plastic bags. Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab hide caption

toggle caption
Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

The Lowly Wax Worm May Hold The Key To Biodegrading Plastic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525447206/525604837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A farm worker collects cucumbers in a greenhouse in Russia. Mac Callaham, a research ecologist at the USDA Forest Service, says William the Worm likely met its fate in "a greenhouse scenario." Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg via Getty Images

This is what's called a "specimen lot" — a large mason jar holding smaller vials of parasitic worms gathered by a researcher in 1927. The Smithsonian collection has more than 120,000 specimen lots. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kristin Adair/NPR

#NPRWormWeek: Worms Are Bottled Up In The Smithsonian's Crawl Space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488404633/489138668" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript