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New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, pictured on Aug. 14, thanked city and county officials on Monday for partnering to expedite a 10-year lead pipe replacement program. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A little girl fills two jerrycans with water in the Korangi slum in Karachi. Fetching water is a duty that often falls on very young children. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

For Karachi's Water Mafia, Stolen H2O Is A 'Lucrative Business'

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Along Saginaw Street in Flint, Mich. Mark Brush/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Mark Brush/Michigan Radio

Even As Levels Improve, Flint Residents Choose Bottled Water Over Tap

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The state says more than 600 pipes have been replaced in Flint, Mich., this year — but 30,000 suspect pipes remain. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

A Year Later, Unfiltered Flint Tap Water Is Still Unsafe To Drink

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Workers inspect an area around storage tanks where a chemical leaked into the Elk River at Freedom Industries' storage facility in Charleston, W.Va., in January 2014. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Freedom Industries, which owned storage tanks blamed in a January 2014 chemical spill, filed for bankruptcy later that month. The company's facility on Barlow Street is seen on the banks of the Elk River in Charleston, W.Va. Tom Hindman/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Hindman/Getty Images

Mayor Karen Weaver takes a sip of water at the House Democratic Steering & Policy Committee hearing titled, "The Flint Water Crisis: Lessons for Protecting America's Children." Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Flint Mayor: 'Everybody Played A Role In This Disaster'

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