viruses viruses

Patients are treated at an Army ward in Kansas during the influenza epidemic of 1918. About 675,000 Americans died of the flu known as "la grippe." NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images

A dust storm moves across the barren plains of northern Kenya in March 2006. Viruses are swept up into the atmosphere via dust storms and ocean spray, and then fall back down to the surface. Chris Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Jackson/Getty Images
Varham Muradyan for NPR

Are There Zombie Viruses In The Thawing Permafrost?

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In 2003, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, also known as mimivirus, was the first giant virus to be described. It's larger than many bacteria, and was found in a water sample from a hospital cooling tower in England. Didier Raoult/Science Source hide caption

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Didier Raoult/Science Source

In Giant Virus Genes, Hints About Their Mysterious Origin

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Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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Bacteriophages, in red, look like tiny aliens, with big heads and skinny bodies. They use their "legs" to stick to and infect a bacterial cell, in blue. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

Your Gut's Gone Viral, And That Might Be Good For Your Health

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These are insect cells infected with the Guaico Culex virus. The different colors denote cells infected with different pieces of the virus. Only the brown-colored cells are infectious, because they contain the complete virus. Michael Lindquist/Cell Press hide caption

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Michael Lindquist/Cell Press