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Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas listens earlier this month as an independent report on violence at a white supremacy rally is read at a news conference. Thomas announced his retirement Monday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

President Trump walks out of the White House toward Marine One on the South Lawn on Monday. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds most Americans think Trump's response to Charlottesville events was "not strong enough." Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Rev. William McKissic whose resolution to condemn white supremacy was passed at the Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting on Wednesday in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Southern Baptist Convention Votes To Condemn White Supremacy

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Richard Spencer, a white nationalist who claims to have coined the term "alt-right," speaks at Texas A&M in College Station, Texas, in Dec. 6, 2016. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Jared Taylor promotes the idea that race is central to innate abilities and national success. He is working to build a United States explicitly for white people. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

White Nationalists' Enthusiasm For Trump Cools

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A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shows a bumper sticker reading "I am a Deplorable" at Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., on Oct. 10. The term references comments by Hillary Clinton that suggest some Trump supporters are "deplorables." Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Richard Spencer addresses a room of press and conference attendees at a news conference held by the National Policy Institute during its "Become Who We Are" event in Washington, D.C. Prior to the news conference, which was held in the same room as the broader NPI event, Spencer told journalists they could not take photos of the room because attendees could be identified without their permission. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

A man poses with a sign of Pepe the Frog outside Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., site of Monday's first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Breitbart's Milo Yiannopoulos, a self-proclaimed leader of the movement, co-wrote a manifesto of sorts about what the alt-right believes. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What You Need To Know About The Alt-Right Movement

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