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Native Americans and their supporters protest in March outside of the White House against the construction of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Police move through the camp of protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., in February. Despite months of protests by Native American tribes and environmental groups, crude oil is now flowing through the pipeline. Angus Mordant for NPR hide caption

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Angus Mordant for NPR

Military veterans protesting the pipeline stand opposite police guarding a bridge at the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 1, 2016. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Piles of debris remain at camp. Some of these items were donated by people who support the movement. Others were abandoned by protesters who left camp. Amy Sisk/Inside Energy hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Inside Energy

Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Clean Up As Deadline Looms

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Hundreds of New Yorkers gathered at Columbus Circle in New York for a protest march to Trump Tower after the president signed an order to advance the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Much of the nearly 180,000 gallons of crude oil spilled went into the Ash Coulee Creek, just 150 miles from the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp. Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health hide caption

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Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health

Pipeline Spill Adds To Concerns About Dakota Access Pipeline

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Protesters demonstrate against the Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Cannon Ball, N.D., hours before a federal judge denied the tribe an injunction against the pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

N.D. Pipeline Protester: 'It's About Our Rights As Native People'

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