U.S. airstrike U.S. airstrike
Stories About

U.S. airstrike

This photo, taken Oct. 27, 2019, the day after the raid on ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's compound in Syria, shows the van that was targeted by U.S. airstrikes. Photos of the van prompted questions about who was targeted. Omar Haj Kadour/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Omar Haj Kadour/AFP via Getty Images

Pentagon files reveal flaws in U.S. claims about Syrian casualties in Baghdadi raid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1186437871/1189149679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Shattered glass is on the ground following a rocket attack in Irbil, the capital of the northern Iraqi Kurdish autonomous region, on Feb. 15. On Thursday, the U.S. launched airstrikes targeting Iranian-backed groups in eastern Syria in response to recent attacks against Americans in Iraq. Safin Hamed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Safin Hamed/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S.-led Operation Inherent Resolve coalition says it currently has nearly 700 open cases of strikes that were reported to have killed civilians. A coalition airstrike is seen here in Mosul, Iraq, this past July. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

Syrian government soldiers walk in the damaged government-held side of Aleppo on Sept. 16. Initially, U.N. officials had observed calm in war-ravaged Aleppo during the recent cease-fire, but Saturday's violence in the country's eastern regions spells ill news for the truce. Youssef Karwashan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Youssef Karwashan/AFP/Getty Images