university of washington university of washington
Stories About

university of washington

A snow fly is seen surviving in the Cascades mountains in Washington state. The insect is capable of surviving below the freezing point of water, continuing to move until it finally freezes itself. John Tuthill hide caption

toggle caption
John Tuthill

Snow flies' funky adaptations to survive (and get frisky) in the cold

The winter is usually when insects die or go into a state of paused development, but for tiny specks on the white snow called snow flies, it's time to run around, find a lover and make baby snow flies. Neuroscientist John Tuthill has been studying these creatures since he first came across them in 2016. He's found that not only can they survive in the cold, but if one of their limbs starts to freeze, they can self-amputate and pop it right off. That buys the snow fly time to find a mate and make sweet, sweet snow fly love.

Snow flies' funky adaptations to survive (and get frisky) in the cold

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198909085/1223015935" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An ambulance pulls up as nurses outside a triage tent for the Emergency Department at the Harborview Medical Center in Seattle put on gowns and other protective gear at the start of their shift, on April 2, 2020. A resurgence of the coronavirus has health care workers and government leaders worried about dwindling resources and an exhausted workforce. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

'We're All Tired Of This': Health Care Workers In Seattle Prepare For Another Surge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/940114449/941616448" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Seattle campus of the University of Washington, pictured in March, is seeing a growing outbreak of COVID-19 cases among fraternity house residents this summer. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Nurse Jeff Gates prepares to assess another patient in UW Medicine's drive-through coronavirus testing clinic in Seattle. Jon Hamilton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Hamilton/NPR

Seattle Health Care System Offers Drive-Through Coronavirus Testing For Workers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/813501632/813504996" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"Access to testing is really the major tool we have right now to fight this new coronavirus," says Dr. Keith Jerome, who runs a University of Washington lab in Seattle that can now test for the virus. Jonathan Hamilton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jonathan Hamilton/NPR

When Coronavirus Struck Seattle, This Lab Was Ready To Start Testing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/812679331/812687438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
NPR

How Computer-Assisted Telepathy Helps Humans Communicate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716410633/721813402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paleontologist Peter Ward speaking on the TED stage. Andrew Heavens/TED hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Heavens/TED

Peter Ward: Are We Headed Into Another Mass Extinction?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495640221/495940847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript