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migrant workers

A Thai worker labors in Israeli fields adjacent to the Gaza Strip on Oct. 12. Ilia Yefimovich/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilia Yefimovich/picture alliance via Getty Images

In this image taken from video, shoppers load purchased items into their vehicle Monday, July 31, 2023, at a Walmart in Lincolnton, N.C., where police say migrant workers were intentionally hit by an SUV in the parking lot of the store a day earlier. Erik Verduzco/AP hide caption

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Erik Verduzco/AP

Paola Mendoza, the daughter of farmworkers, says her parents didn't want her to join them in the fields. She's now in college, studying to be a teacher. Mike Kane for NPR hide caption

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Mike Kane for NPR

As these farmworkers' children seek a different future, farms look for workers abroad

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These workers were promised green cards following Hurricane Katrina. Instead they were issued temporary visas that bound them to a single employer. Courtesy of Ted Quant/Workman hide caption

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Courtesy of Ted Quant/Workman

Sold an American Dream, these workers from India wound up living a nightmare

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Anish Adhikari, now 26, worked construction jobs in Qatar for 33 months in the lead-up to the World Cup. In this 2021 photo, he poses inside the new Lusail stadium, which he helped build and which will host the World Cup final on Dec. 18. Adhikari says the Nepali agent who got him the job misled him about working conditions in Qatar: "They sell a dream that's not reality." Anish Adhikari hide caption

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Anish Adhikari

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

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Workers clean and disinfect the floor at the National Exhibition and Convention Center NECC, the largest makeshift hospital, in Shanghai. Many jobs in these temporary facilities are drawn from the pool of unemployed migrant workers. Ding Ting/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Ding Ting/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Migrant workers in China find new jobs — and precarious conditions — in COVID control

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Aboubakar Soumahoro speaks at a protest in Rome last month. "If the workers lack dignity and rights, the food they provide is virtually rotten," he says in a new short documentary, The Invisibles. Patrizia Cortellessa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrizia Cortellessa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

In Italy, A Migrants' Advocate Fights For The 'Invisibles'

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Qatar charity workers prepare food parcels for migrant laborers living under quarantine on April 16 amid the coronavirus pandemic in Doha. A restaurant better known for fine dining has lent its facilities to Qatar Charity to feed migrant workers, of whom tens of thousands are strictly confined to an area of Doha's southern industrial area. Karim Jaafar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Jaafar/AFP via Getty Images

Prema Thakur, an official for the Champawat district in India, teaches Pratap Singh Bora, a 56-year-old migrant laborer from Nepal, how to write his name in Hindi. Sanju Chand hide caption

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Sanju Chand

A safe-distancing enforcement officer wearing a red armband checks his phone at a food court in Singapore on Saturday. The officers have been deployed to ensure people maintain distance from one another, as Singapore grapples with a spike in coronavirus cases. YK Chan/AP hide caption

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YK Chan/AP

Migrant workers and their family members line up outside a New Delhi bus terminal hoping to board a bus for their villages. Millions have lost their ability to earn an income because of the government-imposed lockdown aimed at limiting the spread of the coronavirus. Bhuvan Bagga/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bhuvan Bagga/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Lockdown Sends Migrant Workers On A Long And Risky Trip Home

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American University researchers (front to back) Marek Cabrera, Dan Perry and Scotty Summers excavate an area in Delta, Pa., where migrant workers camped during the Depression. In the area in this photo, taken in 2016, researchers found evidence of a shelter, a slate mandolin pick and fragments from a ceramic bowl, plate and cup. Courtesy of Justin Uehlein hide caption

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Courtesy of Justin Uehlein

Migrant Workers Leave Behind Clues To Depression-Era Lifestyle

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Barrels of fish sit on a dock after being unloaded from a boat last year at the port in Songkhla, Thailand. Many migrants work in jobs in the country's seafood industry. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Teacher Sarah Ross and students (from left to right) Ximena, age 4, Yareli, age 3, and Kendra, age 2 at the Indiana Migrant Preschool Center, a free preschool for migrant children ages 2 to 5. The school teaches students in English and Spanish with the goal of preparing migrant children for kindergarten, wherever it may be. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Schools Hustle To Reach Kids Who Move With The Harvest, Not The School Year

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