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Facebook announced Wednesday that it will ban white nationalism and separatism content starting next week. "It's clear that these concepts are deeply linked to organized hate groups and have no place on our services," it said. Oli Scarff /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff /AFP/Getty Images

James Alex Fields Jr. was found guilty of killing Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., last year. Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail /AP hide caption

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Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail /AP

Police tape and memorial flowers are seen on Oct. 28, 2018, outside the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pa. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Eli Saslow Traces 'Straight Line' From White Nationalism To Alleged Synagogue Shooter

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Derek Black was following in his father's footsteps in the world of white nationalism until he had a change of heart. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

How A Rising Star Of White Nationalism Broke Free From The Movement

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DeAndre Harris, on the ground, is assaulted in a parking garage beside the Charlottesville, Va., police station on Aug. 12, 2017, after a white nationalist rally was dispersed by police. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

"It brings back a lot of shame," Christian Picciolini says of his time fronting a white power punk band. He has since disavowed the white supremacist movement and works to help others disengage from it too. Dennis Sevilla/Hachette Book Group hide caption

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Dennis Sevilla/Hachette Book Group

A Former Neo-Nazi Explains Why Hate Drew Him In — And How He Got Out

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As a state entity, the University of Florida had to permit Richard Spencer to speak. But its president urged students and staff to avoid the event and "shun" Spencer and his followers. Bernard Brzezinski/University of Florida hide caption

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Bernard Brzezinski/University of Florida

Counterprotesters assemble at the Statehouse before a planned "Free Speech" rally by conservative organizers begins on the adjacent Boston Common, on Saturday. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

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In December, a Texas A&M student signs a message board ahead of an "Aggies United" event in response to a speech by white separatist Richard Spencer. Spencer was scheduled to return to the school for a "White Lives Matter" rally on Sept. 11. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Following the weekend's violent clashes around a white nationalist demonstration in Charlottesville, Va., some are asking what authorities could have done differently. Above, demonstrators and counter-protestors face off at the entrance to Emancipation Park during Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Christian Picciolini, founder of the group Life After Hate, poses for a photograph outside his Chicago home. Picciolini, a former skinhead, is an activist combatting what many see as a surge in white nationalism across the United States. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

A Reformed White Nationalist Speaks Out On Charlottesville

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People receive first aid after a car ran into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The car struck the silver vehicle pictured, sending marchers into the air. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Events Surrounding White Nationalist Rally In Virginia Turn Fatal

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Jared Taylor promotes the idea that race is central to innate abilities and national success. He is working to build a United States explicitly for white people. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

White Nationalists' Enthusiasm For Trump Cools

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The river banks in Sunderland here were once home to shipyards, but like the city's coal mines, they disappeared. In June, the voters of Sunderland voted by more than 60 percent to leave the European Union, even though it would put tens of thousands of local jobs at risk. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

In Pro-Brexit English City, A Jobs Crisis Is Averted — But For How Long?

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump campaigns at a rally in Eau Claire, Wis., on Tuesday. "Mr. Trump and the campaign denounces hate in any form," the campaign said in a statement Tuesday evening. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images