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You asked, we answered: Your questions about electric vehicles

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Buying appliances and vehicles that run on electricity, not fossil fuels, can help reduce our carbon footprint. Making these upgrades will cost money — so you will need to plan ahead, says Joel Rosenberg of the nonprofit group Rewiring America. Clockwise from top left: Bloomberg via Getty Images, Schon/Getty Images, Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images, Juan Algar/Getty Images; Collage by Kaz Fantone hide caption

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Clockwise from top left: Bloomberg via Getty Images, Schon/Getty Images, Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images, Juan Algar/Getty Images; Collage by Kaz Fantone

These 5 big purchases can save energy — and money — at home

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Solar farms surround trees at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. The city voted Wednesday night to decarbonize the city's buildings and install more energy efficient appliances and more solar panels. The city says the move will cut 40% of their carbon emissions. Heather Ainsworth/AP hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth/AP

Steve Reed uses OhmConnect, a service that pays customers to lower their energy use at home during periods of high demand. Megan Wood/inewsource hide caption

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Megan Wood/inewsource

Energy Savings Can Be Fun, But No Need To Turn Off All The Lights

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