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More than 40 states currently have a felony murder law, which juvenile justice advocates believe unfairly impacts young people. Some lawmakers in states such as Illinois and California have sought to enact reform. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Colin Kaepernick was notified by the NFL on Tuesday that he will have a private workout for NFL teams in Atlanta on Saturday. He last played an NFL snap during the 2016 season. Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

Two years into the #MeToo movement, as focus grows on when — and if — it's appropriate for men ousted for sexual harassment to return to work, attention is also shifting to underlying questions of rehabilitation. Can sexual harassers change? And if so, how? Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

Growing Efforts Are Looking At How — Or If — #MeToo Offenders Can Be Reformed

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New York City officials on Thursday announced a $3.3 million settlement with the family of Kalief Browder, who died by suicide after spending nearly three years in Rikers Island, most of it in solitary confinement. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump, with Vice President Pence, poses with a plaque given to him by sheriffs from across the country during a meeting in September. Trump has campaigned as a strong advocate for law enforcement. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

How Trump Went From 'Tough On Crime' To 'Second Chance' For Felons

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Keri Blakinger spent nearly two years incarcerated on narcotics charges before becoming a criminal justice reporter for the Houston Chronicle. Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle

From Convict To Criminal Justice Reporter: 'I Was So Lucky To Come Out Of This'

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President Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House Wednesday as he announces his support for the first major rewrite of the nation's criminal justice sentencing laws in a generation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The exterior of the Supreme Court of Louisiana in New Orleans. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

'Jim Crow's Last Stand' In Louisiana May Fall To Ballot Measure

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The Texas Department of Criminal Justice says it found packages of cocaine with a street value of nearly $18 million inside a shipment of bananas. Russ Widstrand/Getty Images hide caption

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Russ Widstrand/Getty Images

Gov. Jerry Brown holds a copy of a bill to end bail he signed Tuesday, Aug. 28, in Sacramento, Calif. The bill, co-authored by state Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, third from right, and Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, right, makes California the first state to eliminate bail for suspects awaiting trial. It goes into effect in October 2019. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Any amount of opioid use was associated with a higher risk of arrest, parole or probation according to a new study. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Hickman/Getty Images
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Bystanders To Fatal Overdoses Increasingly Becoming Criminal Defendants

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