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New York City officials on Thursday announced a $3.3 million settlement with the family of Kalief Browder, who died by suicide after spending nearly three years in Rikers Island, most of it in solitary confinement. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump, with Vice President Pence, poses with a plaque given to him by sheriffs from across the country during a meeting in September. Trump has campaigned as a strong advocate for law enforcement. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

How Trump Went From 'Tough On Crime' To 'Second Chance' For Felons

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Keri Blakinger spent nearly two years incarcerated on narcotics charges before becoming a criminal justice reporter for the Houston Chronicle. Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle

From Convict To Criminal Justice Reporter: 'I Was So Lucky To Come Out Of This'

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President Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House Wednesday as he announces his support for the first major rewrite of the nation's criminal justice sentencing laws in a generation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The exterior of the Supreme Court of Louisiana in New Orleans. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

'Jim Crow's Last Stand' In Louisiana May Fall To Ballot Measure

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The Texas Department of Criminal Justice says it found packages of cocaine with a street value of nearly $18 million inside a shipment of bananas. Russ Widstrand/Getty Images hide caption

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Russ Widstrand/Getty Images

Gov. Jerry Brown holds a copy of a bill to end bail he signed Tuesday, Aug. 28, in Sacramento, Calif. The bill, co-authored by state Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, third from right, and Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, right, makes California the first state to eliminate bail for suspects awaiting trial. It goes into effect in October 2019. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Any amount of opioid use was associated with a higher risk of arrest, parole or probation according to a new study. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Hickman/Getty Images
Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Bystanders To Fatal Overdoses Increasingly Becoming Criminal Defendants

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By some estimates, nearly half of the people confined in U.S. jails and prisons have a mental illness, notes Alisa Roth, author of Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness. Darrin Klimek/Getty Images hide caption

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Darrin Klimek/Getty Images

'Insane': America's 3 Largest Psychiatric Facilities Are Jails

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Algonquin Books

An American Marriage: Redefining The American Love Story

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Yasmin Vafa, the executive director of the human rights organization Rights4Girls, says Cyntoia Brown's case is an example of the "sexual abuse-to-prison" pipeline that leads some of the most vulnerable women and girls into the criminal justice system. Bethany Bandera hide caption

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Bethany Bandera

Advocates Say Cyntoia Brown's Case Is Part Of The 'Sexual Abuse-To-Prison' Pipeline

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