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A juvenile resident sits in a classroom at the Department of Juvenile Justice's Metro Regional Youth Detention Center in Atlanta. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Protesters gather outside the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on June 16, 2017, after St. Anthony police Officer Jeronimo Yanez was cleared in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile, a black motorist whose death captured national attention when his girlfriend streamed the grim aftermath on Facebook. Steve Karnowski/AP hide caption

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Steve Karnowski/AP

Cop Shooting Death Cases Raise Question: When Is Fear Reasonable?

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Eduardo walks by the spot where he was arrested for selling cocaine when he was 17 in New York City. He was recently pardoned by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo as part of a program that helps people who committed a nonviolent crime when they were 16 or 17 and have stayed conviction-free for at least 10 years. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

After Teenage Mistakes, Pardons Give Second Chances To Ex-Offenders

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Lawyers for the family of Nie Shubin, who was executed by firing squad in 1995 for rape and murder, leave court in December 2014. China's Supreme Court exonerated Nie on Dec. 2, following years of effort by his family to clear his name. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

China Exonerates Man Executed 21 Years Ago For A Murder He Didn't Commit

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State's attorney candidate Aramis Ayala speaks at a campaign rally for Hillary Clinton in Orlando, Fla., on Oct. 28. Joey Roulette hide caption

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Joey Roulette

In The Black Lives Matter Era, An Effort To Elect More Diverse Prosecutors

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