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Native Americans and their supporters protest in March outside of the White House against the construction of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Police move through the camp of protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., in February. Despite months of protests by Native American tribes and environmental groups, crude oil is now flowing through the pipeline. Angus Mordant for NPR hide caption

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Angus Mordant for NPR

Piles of debris remain at camp. Some of these items were donated by people who support the movement. Others were abandoned by protesters who left camp. Amy Sisk/Inside Energy hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Inside Energy

Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Clean Up As Deadline Looms

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Hundreds of New Yorkers gathered at Columbus Circle in New York for a protest march to Trump Tower after the president signed an order to advance the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Several hundred protesters remain camped on the North Dakota prairie in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. They have erected shelters from Army tents to teepees to wooden structures to stay warm this winter. Amy Sisk/Inside Energy hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Inside Energy

Dakota Pipeline Protesters, Nearby Residents Brace For 2017

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Protesters celebrate at Oceti Sakowin Camp earlier Sunday. The Army Corps of Engineers notified the Standing Rock Sioux that the current route for the Dakota Access Pipeline will be denied. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

T.J. Plenty Chief stands in front of one of the three semitrucks owned by his company, Red Road Trucking. The trucks operate in the Fort Berthold reservation oil fields, carrying everything from gravel to pipe to water needed for drilling. His business is based on the reservation, in New Town, N.D., where he lives. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Radio

Upstream From Standing Rock, Tribes Balance Benefits, Risks Of Oil Industry

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Police confront protesters with a rubber bullet gun near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Sunday, during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Stephanie Keith/Reuters hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Reuters

For Many Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters, The Fight Is Personal ListenĀ· 3:48

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP