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Angelita Chegup (left) and Tara Amboh are among four women banished from their reservation for what they say are political reasons. They're now suing the Ute Tribe in Utah. Nate Hegyi /Mountain West News Bureau hide caption

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Nate Hegyi /Mountain West News Bureau

'It Changed Our Lives': Banished Native Women Fight Tribal Leaders In Federal Court

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Kimberly Teehee is being nominated by Cherokee National Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. as a delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Cherokee Nation Names First Delegate To Congress

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Houses on the Navajo Nation sit near sandstone cliffs north of Many Farms, Ariz. New Census Bureau estimates show a low rate of high-speed internet access among Native Americans who live on tribal land. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Tribal leaders worry that they will be left out of discussions surrounding major decisions affecting tribes and their land, like that of the Navajo Nation which covers parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Overs/BBC News for Getty Images

One thing I know now that I didn't three years ago: If we have kids together someday, it won't be their blood that makes them Wampanoag. Purestock/Getty Images hide caption

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Purestock/Getty Images

The Difficult Math Of Being Native American

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP