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President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in West Virginia earlier this month. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

President Trump's Description of What's 'Fake' Is Expanding

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Fake News: An Origin Story

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After speaking at the U.S. Naval Academy's graduation and commissioning ceremony, President Trump tweeted, "To the @NavalAcademy Class of 2018, I say: We know you are up to the task. We know you will make us proud. We know that glory will be yours. Because you are WINNERS, you are WARRIORS, you are FIGHTERS, you are CHAMPIONS, and YOU will lead us to VICTORY! God Bless the U.S.A.!" Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Translated Into 'Trumptalk,' History's Famous Lines Would Look A Little Different

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The myth that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

When It Comes To Politics and 'Fake News,' Facts Aren't Enough

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How Russian Propaganda Spreads On Social Media

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The Ongoing Battle Between Science Teachers And Fake News

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Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video

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Storm Lake Times Editor Art Cullen stands outside his newspaper he started with his brother in 1990. The newspaper won a Pulitzer Prize this year for its editorial writing Clay Masters/IPR hide caption

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Clay Masters/IPR

How Small Town Papers Have Kept Community Trust

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Edgar Maddison Welch, 28, pleaded guilty Friday to two charges related to last year's armed confrontation at the Comet Ping Pong restaurant in Washington, D.C. Welch says he was "self-investigating" false Internet rumors of a pedophile ring at the pizzeria. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

The myth that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

When It Comes To Politics and 'Fake News,' Facts Aren't Enough

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Anas Modamani, a refugee from Syria who posed for a selfie with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in 2015, sued Facebook after his photo was shared in posts falsely accusing him of being a criminal and terrorist. This week, he lost his case in court. Some lawmakers argue that cases like this prove there's a need for new, tougher libel laws. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In A Crucial Election Year, Worries Grow In Germany About Fake News

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