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jared kushner

Senior adviser to the President Jared Kushner used private email and a messaging app to conduct official business, the House oversight committee says. Kushner's lawyer has pushed back on some of the committee's assertions. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Kushner Used Private Email To Conduct Official Business, House Committee Says

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Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump walk on the South Lawn of the White House to board Marine One on their way to the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland on June 1, 2018. Yuri Gripas/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/Bloomberg via Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., sent out 81 document requests to individuals, business entities and agencies related to President Trump for a far-reaching investigation. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

House Judiciary Launches Probe Of Allegations Of Obstruction By President Trump

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White House communications official Bill Shine (left), then-White House chief of staff John Kelly and senior adviser Jared Kushner wait in the Oval Office in December 2018. The New York Times reports that Kelly opposed Kushner's security clearance, but President Trump overruled him and others. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie attends the White House Correspondents' Association dinner at The Washington Hilton in Washington, D.C., on April 28, 2018. Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images

President Trump, with Vice President Pence, poses with a plaque given to him by sheriffs from across the country during a meeting in September. Trump has campaigned as a strong advocate for law enforcement. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

How Trump Went From 'Tough On Crime' To 'Second Chance' For Felons

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Jared Kushner, White House senior adviser and President Trump's son-in-law, is being honored for his "significant contributions in achieving the renegotiation of the new agreement between Mexico, the United States and Canada," according to Mexico's foreign ministry. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House Wednesday as he announces his support for the first major rewrite of the nation's criminal justice sentencing laws in a generation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman have reportedly forged close ties focused on the Middle East peace process. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post; Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post; Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

On Monday, Jared Kushner's family business, Kushner Cos., was fined $210,000 by New York City for falsifying construction building permits. The violations occurred while the presidential adviser was CEO of the company. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Current and former tenants are suing Kushner Cos., the real-estate firm owned by the family of President Trump's son-in-law and White House senior adviser, Jared Kushner, for alleged harassment. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Gridiron dinner, like Fight Club, has rules. Rule No. 1: "Singe, don't burn" with your roast-style jokes. Rule No. 2: No photographs, video or tweeting during the ceremony. There are a few more rules, but really, we're just trying to explain why the photograph above is a shot of Trump from last month. Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

Former White House staff secretary Rob Porter (left), White House chief of staff John Kelly and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner cross the White House South Lawn in August. Kelly on Friday outlined new security clearance protocols after questions were raised about Porter's access. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner has been asked to provide "September 2016 email communications to Mr. Kushner concerning WikiLeaks" and other emails pertaining to a "Russian backdoor overture and dinner invite." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Jared Kushner and his wife, Ivanka Trump, reportedly set up a private email account as their family was coming into power in Washington, D.C. They're seen here last week at left, sitting with Lara Trump and Eric Trump. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner speaks to reporters on Monday, July 24, 2017, after meeting on Capitol Hill behind closed doors with the Senate Intelligence Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Jared Kushner Is In The Spotlight. But Is He In the Tradition Of American Nepotism?

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Jared Kushner, a senior adviser to President Trump, makes a statement at the White House Monday after being interviewed by the Senate Intelligence Committee in Washington, D.C. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images