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extremism

People attend the visitation service for Margie Reckard at La Paz Faith Center in El Paso, Texas, in August 2019. She was killed in white supremacist attack that targeted Latinos at a Walmart. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

2019 Brought Stepped-Up Efforts To Counter White Supremacist Violence

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Members of Parents For Peace gathered in Washington recently for its annual summit. The group is made up of former extremists and their families. Hannah Allam/NPR hide caption

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Hannah Allam/NPR

'We Were Blindsided': Families Of Extremists Form Group To Fight Hate

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ISIS attacks abroad and a series of deadly right-wing attacks in the U.S. have fueled a demand for more information on extremist networks. Understanding them is the first step in fighting them. But there has been little discussion about potential harm to the researchers tasked with looking deep inside the world's most dangerous movements. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'It Gets To You.' Extremism Researchers Confront The Unseen Toll Of Their Work

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Mike Signer, mayor of Charlottesville at the time, checks his phone while waiting to speak days after Heather Heyer was killed during the Unite the Right rally in 2017. These days Signer travels the country presenting his city's experience as a cautionary tale. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Members of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, or RSS, stand at attention and salute a saffron-orange flag at a morning shakha, or drill session, in a park in suburban Mumbai, India. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

The Powerful Group Shaping The Rise Of Hindu Nationalism In India

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Instagram has increasingly become a home for hate speech and extremist content, according to Taylor Lorenz, a reporter for The Atlantic. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Instagram Has A Problem With Hate Speech And Extremism, 'Atlantic' Reporter Says

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Dennis Christensen, a Danish Jehovah's Witness accused of extremism, is escorted into a courtroom to hear his verdict in the town of Oryol on Feb. 6. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion: Jehovah's Witnesses Cling To Faith Despite Arrests In Russia

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Abdirahman Sheik Mohamud is shown in a Columbus, Ohio, courtroom in 2015. He was arrested after traveling to Syria, then returning to Ohio, where he planned to carry out an attack. According to a new report, he's one of 12 Americans who went to join extremist groups in Syria or Iraq, and then returned back to the U.S. Mohamud was sentenced last month to 22 years in prison. Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP hide caption

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Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP

Americans In ISIS: Some 300 Tried To Join, 12 Have Returned To U.S.

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In his campaign, Trump criticized President Obama for his reluctance to use the words "radical Islamic extremism." The Trump administration may now want to refocus key programs on Muslim extremists. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

Trump Reportedly Plans To Refocus Violent Extremism Initiative On Muslims

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