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A federal court hears arguments in a case brought by Democratic lawmakers about whether the Trump Organization's business dealings with foreign governments violates the Constitution's Emoluments Clause. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Trump Organization Deals In Asia Fuel Debate On Emoluments Lawsuit

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A lawsuit brought by the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia regarding President Trump's profits from the Trump International Hotel near the White House can proceed, a federal judge has ruled. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Police stand guard outside the Trump International Hotel, blocks from the White House, last year. The hotel has become a centerpiece of lawsuits claiming the president is profiting from the office. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Federal Judge Seems Sympathetic To Anti-Corruption Case Against President Trump

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Washington, D.C., attorney Jeffrey Lovitky has taken it upon himself to sue President Trump. Peter Overby/NPR hide caption

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Peter Overby/NPR

For 1 Attorney, A Lonely Legal Fight To Make Trump Comply With Rules

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Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington filed a suit just three days after President Trump took office. The suit alleges he is violating the Constitution's ban on accepting foreign payments, or emoluments. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Court Challenge Begins: Is Trump Taking Unconstitutional Emoluments?

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Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., is among the more than 190 Democrats who are suing President Trump over his business deals involving foreign governments. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh (left) and District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine announce a lawsuit against President Trump over conflicts of interest with his businesses on Monday in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Protestors demonstrating April 15 against President Trump's purported ties to foreign governments walk by the Trump hotel during in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump (hidden at left) have dinner with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife, Akie, at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 10. Trump said he would personally pay for the visit to his resort . Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Critics Say Trump Group Doing New Foreign Deals, Despite Pledge To Refrain

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Many groups are raising questions about President Trump's conflicts of interest, but do they have the "standing" to challenge him in court? Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Can Groups Sue Over Trump's Business Conflicts Even If They Weren't Harmed?

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When interests such as the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., take money from foreign governments, it's a potential violation of the Constitution, according to the group that filed the lawsuit. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President-elect Donald Trump speaks with the media at Trump Tower in New York on Dec. 6, 2016. Ethics experts warn that Trump's business interests could violate the Constitution. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images

Ethics Lawyers Call Trump's Business Conflicts 'Nakedly Unconstitutional'

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Vincent J. Viola, a West Point graduate who served in the 101st Airborne, owns the Florida Panthers and is Donald Trump's pick to be secretary of the Army. Omar Vega/Invision/AP hide caption

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Omar Vega/Invision/AP

The Richest Administration In History Just Got Richer

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