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Researchers have found that giving your brain a little electrical zap while you sleep can lead to quicker learning and improved memory. Future You's episode 6 explores what this will mean in 2050. NPR hide caption

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NPR

VIDEO: The Military Discovered A Way To Boost Soldiers' Memories, And We Tried It

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Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals, by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers Scribner hide caption

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Scribner
NPR

Move Objects With Your Mind? We're Getting There, With The Help Of An Armband

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Elise Hu / NPR

Higher, Better, Stronger, Faster — Brain Science Is Trying To Get There

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The Xiahe mandible was originally found in 1980 in Baishiya Karst Cave. Researchers say the bone is 160,000 years old and came from a Denisovan. Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University hide caption

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Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University

Denisovans, A Mysterious Kind Of Ancient Humans, Are Traced To Tibet

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP/Getty Images

The Weight of Our Words

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An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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(Left) A close-up view of a spirally fractured mastodon femur. (Right) A boulder discovered at the Cerutti Mastodon site in San Diego County thought to have been used by early humans as a hammerstone. Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum hide caption

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Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum

New Evidence Suggests Humans Arrived In The Americas Far Earlier Than Thought

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Martin Meissner/AP

Were Neanderthals Religious?

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