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Elise Hu / NPR

Higher, Better, Stronger, Faster — Brain Science Is Trying To Get There

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The Xiahe mandible was originally found in 1980 in Baishiya Karst Cave. Researchers say the bone is 160,000 years old and came from a Denisovan. Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University hide caption

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Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University

Denisovans, A Mysterious Kind Of Ancient Humans, Are Traced To Tibet

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An illustration from 1870 shows Prehistoric men using wooden clubs and stone axe to fend off an attacks by a large cave bear. The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) was a species of bear that lived in Europe during the Pleistocene and became extinct at the beginning of the Last Glacial Maximum, about 27,500 years ago. Mammoths can be seen in the background. British Library/Science Source hide caption

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British Library/Science Source

New Study Says Ancient Humans Hunted Big Mammals To Extinction

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images

The Weight of Our Words

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An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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(Left) A close-up view of a spirally fractured mastodon femur. (Right) A boulder discovered at the Cerutti Mastodon site in San Diego County thought to have been used by early humans as a hammerstone. Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum hide caption

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Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum

New Evidence Suggests Humans Arrived In The Americas Far Earlier Than Thought

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Martin Meissner/AP

Were Neanderthals Religious?

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