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Insurers must cover coronavirus testing, according to federal law, but medical visits to discuss symptoms may not be covered, unless a test is ordered at that time. ER Productions Limited/Getty Images hide caption

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

She Went To The ER To Try To Get A Coronavirus Test And Ended Up $1,840 In Debt

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Over the past decade, hospitals have been rapidly building outpatient clinics or purchasing existing independent ones. It was a lucrative business strategy because such clinics could charge higher rates, on the premise that they were part of a hospital. Medicare's recent rule change puts a damper on all that. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Even for conventional medical treatments that are covered under most health insurance policies, the large copays and high deductibles have left many Americans with big bills, says a health economist, who sees the rise in medical fundraisers as worrisome. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Patients Are Turning To GoFundMe To Fill Health Insurance Gaps

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People who earn up to 400 percent of the poverty level (about $48,500 for an individual and $100,400 for a family of four in 2019) are eligible for subsidies of the cost of their marketplace health plans. But many of the 5 million who aren't eligible feel crushed by rising costs. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Many Medicare patients don't realize they can sometimes pay less out of pocket for a prescription drug if they pay cash, instead of the insurance copay. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Doctors and hospitals are increasingly asking patients to pay up front for deductibles, which can cost thousands. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto