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Painted portrait of Wong Kim Ark in the Asian American Community Heroes Mural, located in San Francisco's Chinatown. Julie Caine/Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco hide caption

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Julie Caine/Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco

The State Department has updated its policy regarding granting citizenship to children born via in vitro fertilization or surrogacy. Its earlier rules denied citizenship to those children unless they had direct genetic ties to their parent who was a U.S. citizen. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Demonstrators protest against the Citizenship Amendment Act near Jamia Millia Islamia on Dec. 15 in New Delhi. Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

'Our Democracy Is In Danger': Muslims In India Say Police Target Them With Violence

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An image of Ow Luen from his file, originally held at the USCIS, now available at the National Archives. Grant Din/National Archives hide caption

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Grant Din/National Archives

Tracing Your Family's Roots May Soon Get A Lot More Expensive

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John Fitisemanu, an American Samoan, filed the lawsuit against the U.S. government after he was denied the opportunity to apply for federal government jobs listing citizenship as a requirement. Katrina Keil Youd/AP hide caption

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Katrina Keil Youd/AP

A new Trump administration policy on citizenship for children born abroad may affect only a small fraction of U.S. service members and government employees, but its announcement drew anger. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What Do New Citizenship Rules For Kids Of U.S. Military, Workers Abroad Mean?

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Soleman Nessa's husband took his own life after authorities questioned his citizenship. "It was the month of Ramadan. The sun was rising. We were boiling rice and when my son went to the kitchen to get something, he saw my husband hanging there. He screamed. People from all over the village came and brought him down," Nessa says. The family had exhausted its savings to confirm Nessa's citizenship. CK Vijayakumar for NPR hide caption

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CK Vijayakumar for NPR

Tobiron Nessa, 45, is the only member of her immediate family whom the Indian government recognizes as a citizen. Her husband and five children have all been left off the National Register of Citizens even though she says all have Indian birth certificates. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Millions In India Face Uncertain Future After Being Left Off Citizenship List

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Elad Dvash-Banks (left) and his husband, Andrew, pose for photos with their twin sons, Ethan (right) and Aiden, in their Los Angeles apartment on Tuesday. Ethan is a plaintiff in a federal lawsuit against the State Department that seeks the same rights as his brother, who is a U.S. citizen. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Same-Sex Couples Sue U.S. Government For Kids' Citizenship

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The Supreme Court says a lower court erred in its guidance to a jury about the standard for stripping a refugee of her American citizenship. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Couples stand in line to obtain their marriage licenses in this photograph, taken sometime between 1915 and 1920. The 1907 Expatriation Act would have affected people trying to get married during this time period — though the couples depicted in this photo were not necessarily affected by the Expatriation Act. George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress hide caption

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George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

The Capitol of Puerto Rico, Capitolio de Puerto Rico, in San Juan. Puerto Rico is under federal control, but isn't allowed voting representation in Congress, and residents can't vote for president. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Ricans Reflect On A Century Of (Limited) Citizenship

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Lines for citizenship and other immigration services have been forming as early as 6 a.m. outside the office of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. Parker Yesko/NPR hide caption

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Parker Yesko/NPR

Green Card Holders Worry About Trump's Efforts To Curtail Immigration

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Lorenzo Palma (center) reviews family documents with his brother and mother in their home in El Paso, Texas. Palma served time for a parole violation and, just as he was being released, was sent before an immigration court to prove his U.S. citizenship. Bree Lamb for NPR hide caption

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Bree Lamb for NPR