state politics state politics

A mail-in ballot for Denver, Colo. There are local elections on Tuesday and there's been a struggle to find candidates to run in many parts of Colorado. Ann Marie Awad/Colorado Public Radio News hide caption

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Ann Marie Awad/Colorado Public Radio News

When Election Day Comes And There's Only One Candidate On The Ballot

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It has become increasingly common for politicians at all levels of government to block followers, whether it's for uncivil behavior or merely for expressing a different point of view. HStocks/Getty Images hide caption

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HStocks/Getty Images

U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks with reporters on Capitol Hill last month. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Facing Unrest On The Left, Dianne Feinstein Draws A Primary Opponent

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Democratic candidate for the Virginia House of Delegates, Schuyler VanValkenburg canvasses a street last month in Henrico, Va. VanValkenburg is part of a surge of Democratic candidates running in Virginia this fall. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Shut Out Of Power In D.C., Democrats Try To Make Inroads In Virginia This Fall

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North Carolina Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger says Democrats are looking to deflect blame for their electoral losses. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Wisconsin lawmakers are considering a $3 billion package of incentives to encourage Taiwanese electronics company Foxconn, which has had a presence in southern China, to build a factory in the state. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Despite Fiscal Warning, Wisconsin Plans To Move Ahead With Foxconn Deal

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Demonstrators march in the Texas Capitol in Austin on Monday, protesting the state's newly passed anti-sanctuary cities bill, which empowers police to inquire about people's immigration status during routine interactions such as traffic stops. Meredith Hoffman/AP hide caption

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Meredith Hoffman/AP

A statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee, as it was removed from its longtime resting place in New Orleans on Friday. Lee's statue was the last of four Confederate monuments to be removed under a 2015 City Council vote. Scott Threlkeld/AP hide caption

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Scott Threlkeld/AP

The next generation of cell phone technology will be much faster but require far more antennas than carriers currently use. Lionel Bonaventure /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure /AFP/Getty Images

Wireless Industry Lobbies Statehouses For Access To 'Street Furniture'

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Spectators look down on the Nevada Assembly on the opening day of the legislative session in Carson City, Nev., in February. On Wednesday, state senators backed the Assembly and voted to adopt the Equal Rights Amendment. Lance Iversen/AP hide caption

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Lance Iversen/AP

Nevada Ratifies The Equal Rights Amendment ... 35 Years After The Deadline

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A police officer votes at Belmont High School on Feb. 9, 2016, in Belmont, N.H., during the New Hampshire presidential primary. The state's lawmakers are now debating bills that would tighten residency requirements for new voters. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

State Republicans Push For More Restrictive Voting Laws

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Eric Greitens, shortly before becoming governor of Missouri in January 2017. To address a revenue shortfall, Greitens cut $68 million in spending for the state's higher education system shortly after taking office. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP

As State Budget Revenues Fall Short, Higher Education Faces A Squeeze

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Kate Noble speaks to voters at a listening session at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, N.M. She ran for a seat on the Santa Fe Public Schools Board. Megan Kamerick/KUNM hide caption

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Megan Kamerick/KUNM

Trump's Election Drives More Women To Consider Running For Office

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Gas prices seen at an Oklahoma City 7-Eleven in December. Amid a state budget slump, Oklahoma lawmakers are considering raising gas taxes for the first time in 30 years. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Gas Taxes May Go Up Around The Country As States Seek To Plug Budget Holes

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Former Georgia Rep. Mike Dudgeon casts the ceremonial first vote of the new session of the Georgia House of Representatives on Jan. 10, 2011, in Atlanta. Dudgeon retired from the Legislature in 2016 because of work-life balance issues. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Low Pay In State Legislatures Means Some Can't Afford The Job

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