venezuela food shortage venezuela food shortage

A crowd waits to cross the border into Colombia over the Simón Bolívar bridge in San Antonio del Táchira, Venezuela, in July 2016. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuela's Deepening Crisis Triggers Mass Migration Into Colombia

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Venezuelan Bolivarian National Guards officers control shoppers as they line up outside a supermarket to buy food at discounted prices in Caracas on Jan. 6. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

In an effort to combat chronic food shortages, President Nicolas Maduro and his ministers are embarking on a campaign to convince Venezuelans to eat rabbits. GK Hart/Vikki Hart/The Image Bank/Getty Images hide caption

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GK Hart/Vikki Hart/The Image Bank/Getty Images

The Royal restaurant serves cheese arepas in Washington, D.C. As Venezuelans flee their troubled country, they bring with them a taste for the popular cornmeal cakes. Joy Asico/Courtesy of The Royal hide caption

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Joy Asico/Courtesy of The Royal

A bakery worker grabs a bags of bread in Caracas, Venezuela, last month. Venezuelan bakeries are the latest industry to find themselves in the cross-hairs of President Nicolas Maduros administration, as bread lines grow in the capital Caracas. The government has ordered bakers to use scarce supplies of flour to produce price-controlled loaves. Wil Riera/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Wil Riera/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Venezuela's Bread Wars: With Food Scarce, Government Accuses Bakers Of Hoarding

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A Venezuelan soldier watches over cargo trucks leaving the port in Puerto Cabello, which handles the majority of the country's food imports. Across the chain of command, from high-level generals to the lowest foot soldiers, military officials are using their growing power over the food supply to siphon off wealth for themselves. Ricardo Nunes/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Nunes/AP

As Venezuelans Go Hungry, The Military Is Trafficking In Food

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