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President Trump speaks on the phone in January with Russian President Vladimir Putin, joined by top White House figures Reince Priebus (from left), Vice President Pence, Steve Bannon, Sean Spicer and Michael Flynn. Only Pence remains. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Then-national security adviser Michael Flynn speaks at the White House earlier this year. He has agreed to turn over business documents to senators investigating Russia's meddling with the 2016 elections. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn sitting in the White House in February. The Senate Intelligence Committee announced it has subpoenaed two companies owned by Flynn. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Michael Flynn (with his hand to his ear) sits next to Russian President Vladimir Putin at a dinner in Moscow on Dec. 10, 2015, celebrating the 10th anniversary of RT, an English-language TV channel funded by the Russian government. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Michael Flynn's Contradictory Line On Russia

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National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, right, takes to the stage Tuesday at the White House after being introduced by Press Secretary Sean Spicer. Both of them, as well as Vice President Mike Pence, have had their credibility damaged after issuing denials that President Trump later reversed. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Bit By Bit, Trump Is Shredding Credibility Of White House Officials

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President Trump weighed back in on Twitter, apparently trying to switch subjects, from the troubles of his former national security adviser to raising the possibility of a government shutdown. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Michael Flynn, seen here arriving for a news conference in the East Room of the White House in February, is being investigated by the inspector general of the Department of Defense, Rep. Elijah Cummings said Thursday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

House Oversight Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah (right), and ranking member Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., speak to reporters about Michael Flynn, President Trump's former national security adviser, on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Then-Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates speaks during a news conference at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., in 2016. Yates is scheduled to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee on May 8. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn's lawyer says Flynn has offered to testify about Trump campaign contacts with Russia if he gets immunity from prosecution. Flynn is seen at the White House on Feb. 13. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Top House Democrats, including Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. (at the podium), said this week they want an investigation into President Trump's connections with Russia, such as when he learned that his national security adviser, Michael Flynn, had discussed U.S. sanctions with a Russian diplomat. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel (left) walks with Vice Adm. Robert Harward (center), the deputy commander of U.S. Central Command, and Col. Kelly Martin, the vice commander of 6th Air Mobility Wing, after landing at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla., in 2013. Erin A. Kirk-Cuomo/DoD hide caption

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Erin A. Kirk-Cuomo/DoD

President Trump speaks on the phone in the Oval Office with now-former national security adviser Michael Flynn (center) and White House chief strategist Steve Bannon on Jan. 28. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Then-deputy director of CENTCOM, U.S. Navy Vice Admiral Robert Harward, is pictured with Jordan's Prince Faisal and the Army's head of operations and training Major General Awni Adwan in a May 2012 photo. Harward is now under consideration to replace Michael Flynn as President Trump's national security adviser. Khalil Mazraawi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi /AFP/Getty Images

Then-national security adviser Michael Flynn, senior adviser Jared Kushner and President Trump. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. Now, the focus moves to what he told investigators. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

White House Press secretary Sean Spicer takes questions from the media on Tuesday. He said it was President Trump's decision to have national security adviser Michael Flynn resign. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Questions have loomed over National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's contact with a Russian diplomat in late December — and the explanation provided by the White House has changed over time. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images