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Dr. Rebecca Gomperts says the government has seized abortion drugs she has prescribed from overseas to patients in the U.S. The drugs are approved by the FDA to induce abortion under a doctor's direction. Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Supporters of Planned Parenthood demonstrated at New York's City Hall against the Trump administration's Title X rule change in February. Planned Parenthood now says it clinics nationwide will stop using federal Title X family planning funds. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Natalie Lynch at a relative's home with her youngest child, Maycen. In 2014, when Lynch was pregnant with her older child, she spent two weeks before giving birth in a prison cell, mostly alone. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Pregnant, Locked Up, And Alone

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Abortion-rights activists, politicians and others associated with Planned Parenthood gather for a demonstration against the Trump administration's Title X rule change on Feb. 25 in New York. Multiple lawsuits have been filed opposing the new rule. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Abortion opponents see the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court as an opportunity to push for further abortion restrictions. Abortion supporters are preparing for a fight. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

With Kavanaugh Confirmed, Both Sides Of Abortion Debate Gear Up For Battle

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Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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Thousands of abortion-rights opponents demonstrate in Dublin on March 10. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

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Abortion-rights advocate Kim Gibson, a "clinic defender," keeps watch at the entrance of the Jackson Women's Health Organization clinic, the only clinic providing abortions in Mississippi, last month. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Kelly Kuhns's 2-year-old son Oliver was born with Down syndrome. She says that she was shocked when a prenatal test revealed a Trisomy 21 mutation. But, she says, "he's still a baby. He's still worthy of a life just like everybody else." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Down Syndrome Families Divided Over Abortion Ban

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A gestational surrogate is a woman who carries a fetus but is not genetically related to it, in order to help other people become parents. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

Opponents of abortion rights gather at the Washington Monument to hear Vice President Pence speak at the March for Life rally on Friday. Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images

On Abortion, Goals Of Back-To-Back Marches Couldn't Be More Different

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President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family before formally signing his cabinet nominations into law on Jan. 20 in the President's Room of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. From left are, Vice President Mike Pence, the president's wife Melania Trump, their son Barron Trump, and House Speaker Paul Ryan. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP