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In the White House briefing room, Sarah Sanders often moves quickly from one news outlet to the next, cutting off follow-up questions and ending press conferences with many reporters' questions unanswered. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In The White House Press Room, Sarah Sanders Channels President Trump

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President Trump speaks on the phone in January with Russian President Vladimir Putin, joined by top White House figures Reince Priebus (from left), Vice President Pence, Steve Bannon, Sean Spicer and Michael Flynn. Only Pence remains. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Anthony Scaramucci blows a kiss to the gathered press in the White House briefing room on July 21, as White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders stands by. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White House press secretary Sean Spicer briefs the media in June. He announced Friday that he was stepping down from his job in the Trump administration and would continue his service through August. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, right, takes to the stage Tuesday at the White House after being introduced by Press Secretary Sean Spicer. Both of them, as well as Vice President Mike Pence, have had their credibility damaged after issuing denials that President Trump later reversed. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Bit By Bit, Trump Is Shredding Credibility Of White House Officials

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President Trump weighed back in on Twitter, apparently trying to switch subjects, from the troubles of his former national security adviser to raising the possibility of a government shutdown. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Through a video camera viewfinder, President Trump is seen addressing the crowd during the Conservative Political Action Conference in February. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images

U.S. artist Ryan Mendoza poses for a photo next to the former house of Afro-American human rights figure Rosa Parks on Mendoza's property on April 6, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. Mendoza bought the house, which was slated for demolition in Detroit, took it apart, shipped it to Germany, and put it back together again on the property next to his studio. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images