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Women's March

A woman shouts slogans during the Women's March in New York City, January 20, 2018, as protestors took to the streets en masse across the United States. It was a sign of lasting outrage, coming a year after the first women's marches following President Trump's inauguration. KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images

The Women's Wave: Backlash To Trump Persists, Reshaping Politics In 2018

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LOS ANGELES, USA - JANUARY 20: People participate in the Women's March rally on January 20, 2018 in Los Angeles, California, United States. (Photo by Morgan Lieberman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images) Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Double Bind For Women In Leadership

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Diane Askwyth leads cheers as protestors make their way to Sam Boyd Stadium for the Women's March "Power to the Polls" voter registration tour launch on January 21, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sam Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Morris/Getty Images

Organizers of the marches, such as the rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., were hoping to avoid some of the pitfalls from last year's event. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

The call for female workers to strike Wednesday comes on International Women's Day, which helped to inspire the strike and follows the Women's March in January. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Female Workers Asked To Join In 'A Day Without A Woman' Protests

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Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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Opponents of abortion rights gather at the Washington Monument to hear Vice President Pence speak at the March for Life rally on Friday. Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images

On Abortion, Goals Of Back-To-Back Marches Couldn't Be More Different

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