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The perception of universal success among Asian-Americans is being wielded to downplay racism's role in the persistent struggles of other minority groups, especially black Americans. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

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Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

Roy Ebihara (far left) with his siblings, Mary, Kathy and Bill, on Easter 1941 in Clovis, N.M. In 2014, Roy and his family received a formal public apology from the mayor of Clovis for the mistreatment they endured there. Courtesy of Roy Ebihara hide caption

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Courtesy of Roy Ebihara

Couple Moves On From Silence About Time In Japanese Internment Camps

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Pictures of people who were incarcerated at Manzanar War Relocation Center are displayed alongside family tags at Manzanar National Historic Site near Independence, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images