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An image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows sulfur dioxide plumes rising from Kilauea's fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck, viewed from a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Activity at Halema'uma'u Crater has increased to include the nearly continuous emission of ash with intermittent stronger pulses at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This photo was made at around 9 a.m. local time Tuesday. U.S. Geological Survey/AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey/AP

Severe ground cracks associated with what's known as Fissure 14 are seen in a burned-out landscape in Leilani Estates near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii, on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Scientists say the lava from Kilauea's new eruption may continue to flow for months or even years. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight

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In this handout photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava from a fissure slowly rolls down the street on Saturday in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii after the eruption of the Kilauea volcano last week. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Getty Images