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environmental justice

A line of petrochemical facilities in St. Charles Parish, La., in 2018. Many people who live near industrial sites, and who are exposed to dangerous pollution, fear that the Inflation Reduction Act will deepen existing environmental inequalities. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Protesters attempt to block the delivery of toxic PCB waste to a landfill in Warren County, N.C., in 1982. It was in response to the state's decision to locate a hazardous waste landfill in a low-income, predominantly Black area of Warren County that the term "environmental racism" was first used by the Rev. Ben Chavis. Jenny Labalme hide caption

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Jenny Labalme

Hope And Skepticism As Biden Promises To Address Environmental Racism

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The Monastery of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Washington, D.C. is the new host of a 151 kW community solar garden. The panels will provide roughly 50 nearby households with green energy. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

Some environmental justice advocates say California's cap-and-trade program hasn't done anything to clean up the air in low-income communities like Wilmington, where refineries are located near residential neighborhoods. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Environmental Groups Say California's Climate Program Has Not Helped Them

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