missile missile

Wreckage of a building described as part of the Scientific Studies and Research Centre (SSRC) compound in the Barzeh district, north of Damascus, in a photo from April. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter's brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound. Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS hide caption

toggle caption
Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS

Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooter's Brain At Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/606142634/606990298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Honolulu attorney Michael Green, right, sits with his client, the former Hawaii Emergency Management Agency employee who sent a false missile alert to residents and visitors in Hawaii, left, during an interview with reporters on Feb. 2, 2018 in Honolulu. The ex-state employee says he's devastated about causing panic, but he believed it was a real attack at the time. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Who Should Warn The Public Of Nuclear War?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/584688294/585299124" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images

Pedestrians walk in front of a large video screen in Tokyo broadcasting a news report about North Korea's latest missile test that passed over Japan early Friday morning. Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Fires Another Missile Over Japan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/551095592/551168946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

During a Saturday parade commemorating its founder's birthday, North Korea rolled out what appeared to be new intercontinental ballistic missiles. The country has been warned against having such weapons. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Wong Maye-E/AP

North Korean soldiers in a mass military parade at Kim Il-Sung square in Pyongyang on Oct. 10, 2015. North Korea conducted its first missile test of the year Sunday morning. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Test-Fires First Missile During Trump's Presidency

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514778665/514811267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript