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The White House at night last week. President Trump has picked a new ethics chief, who, unlike past appointments, has won praise from experts. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

White House staffers may need assistance from a legal defense fund if special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe pulls them in for questioning. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway said in an interview on Thursday that the federal disclosure rules could be too cumbersome. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Outgoing ethics director Walter Shaub said in January that President Trump's plan to reduce conflicts of interest "doesn't meet the standards ... that every president in the past four decades has met." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ethics Office Director Walter Shaub Resigns, Saying Rules Need To Be Tougher

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Walter M. Shaub Jr., director of the Office of Government Ethics, notified the White House and federal agencies in April that his office wanted to see all ethics waivers issued by President Trump's administration, setting a June 1 deadline. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Walter Shaub, director of the United States Office of Government Ethics. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

As Trump Inquiries Flood Ethics Office, Director Looks To House For Action

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Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway (right) and former Sen. Jim DeMint, now president of the Heritage Foundation, walk away from the West Wing of the White House on Wednesday. The White House declined to discipline Conway for a lapse in a recent on-air interview, rebuffing the Office of Government Ethics. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

In the White House's letter to the Office of Government Ethics this week, there's something potentially far more interesting than the administration's response to Kellyanne Conway's Nordstrom comments. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Experts Say White House's Conway Response Raises Major Ethical Questions

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